Mobile and Social Media To-Do List #5

Look familiar? . . .

For Monday, Feb. 22

  • Readings: Read all of Chapter 5 and pages 123-134 of Chapter 6.
  • Teaching Moment: Sign up for a Teaching Moment session. Choose a week to present. You can work in teams of two or fly solo.

Due by 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. View grading criteria.

Multimedia Story #1

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week. We’ll review these details in class.

  • 550- to 600-word story with mobile-friendly layout.
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) produced using the iMovie mobile app. Upload the finished video to your YouTube channel and then embedded in your story.

Social Media 

These items must be spread out during the reporting process and completed by 9 p.m., Feb. 24. Create a Wakelet with the items mentioned below. This is how I will evaluate and grade your social media engagement for your first story.

You should have a social media game plan for every story before heading out the door. Below are the items you’re required to share while producing your first story. You do not have to use #ICParkSM. Remember, posts should be social media optimized. For example, they’ll include @mentions, hashtags, tags, and visuals — items that lead to increased engagement. Also, it’s a good idea to periodically mention you’re covering the story for Ithaca Week by @mentioning in posts. 

  • Twitter thread with at least four tweets. Give your audience meaningful info: use quotes from sources, ask a question about the story, provide a behind-the-scenes look. Don’t simply write, “here’s a tease of my story” or “package coming soon.” This is newsroom jargon and doesn’t engage our audiences.
  • A video specifically for social media. Share to Twitter and your professional Facebook page. Keep this under 30 seconds.
  • Share at least two photos to Twitter and your professional Facebook page. Provide context about what you’re showing followers.  Remember to “speak the language” of the different platforms.
  • You are absolutely free to use any other platforms during the reporting process. Go for it!

Mobile and Social Media To-Do List #4

Story Ideas Reminder

  • Three story ideas: We’ll have a pitch session during class Monday. Remember that at least two out of your four stories this semester must be beat related.

For Monday, Feb. 22

  • Readings: Read all of Chapter 5 and pages 123-134 of Chapter 6.
  • Teaching Moment: Sign up for a Teaching Moment session. Choose a week to present. You can work in teams of two or fly solo.

Due by 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. View grading criteria.

Multimedia Story #1

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week. We’ll review these details in class.

  • 550- to 600-word story with mobile-friendly layout.
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) produced using the iMovie mobile app. Upload the finished video to your YouTube channel and then embedded in your story.

Social Media 

These items must be spread out during the reporting process and completed by 9 p.m., Feb. 24. Create a Wakelet with the items mentioned below. This is how I will evaluate and grade your social media engagement for your first story.

You should have a social media game plan for every story before heading out the door. Below are the items you’re required to share while producing your first story. You do not have to use #ICParkSM. Remember, posts should be social media optimized. For example, they’ll include @mentions, hashtags, tags, and visuals — items that lead to increased engagement. Also, it’s a good idea to periodically mention you’re covering the story for Ithaca Week by @mentioning in posts. 

  • Twitter thread with at least four tweets. Give your audience meaningful info: use quotes from sources, ask a question about the story, provide a behind-the-scenes look. Don’t simply write, “here’s a tease of my story” or “package coming soon.” This is newsroom jargon and doesn’t engage our audiences.
  • A video specifically for social media. Share to Twitter and your professional Facebook page. Keep this under 30 seconds.
  • Share at least two photos to Twitter and your professional Facebook page. Provide context about what you’re showing followers.  Remember to “speak the language” of the different platforms.
  • You are absolutely free to use any other platforms during the reporting process. Go for it!

Mobile and Social Media To-Do List #3

By midnight Saturday, Feb. 13:

  • Add your website/social media links to this Google document.
  • Complete the set-up of your website. If your site is not looking the way you would like it to, please chat with me for help.
  • Two blog posts: One must be related to your beat. In the second post, reflect upon the readings, and how mobile devices and social media are impacting journalism. Address the Discussion questions listed in the Checklist at the end of Chapter 1.
  • Share both blog entries via your professional FB page, Twitter, and LinkedIn. I highly recommend giving your followers a heads up about the beat you’ll be covering this semester. Don’t forget to use our class hashtag #ICParkSM (sensitive) and tag the book and/or me @MobileJourn @AllisonFrisch07.

For Monday, Feb. 15

  • Read pages 76 and 79 (Social Media Command Center) to 92 of Chapter 4. 
  • Ensure that your profile photo and bios are up-to-date across all platforms.
  • Facebook Page Tip: After creating your professional Facebook page, invite people to “like” it.
  • LinkedIn Tip: I recommend completing the following sections — headline, summary, experience, skills, education, honors/awards, and organizations/groups. Get in the habit of connecting with people on LinkedIn on a consistent basis, especially professionals you’ve met.
  • Create three Twitter lists: one for your beat, one for local news sources, and another for sources that will keep you updated on the latest mobile and social media journalism trends. Each list must have at least 15 sources. This Resources page has a list of sources that you could use for the mobile and social media journalism list. Keep your lists public so I can view them. It’s a good idea to place those lists in your Hootsuite or TweetDeck dashboard.
  • Three story ideas. Time to report!

Mobile and Social Media To-Do List #2

Welcome to WEEK 2!

Complete these items by Wednesday, Feb. 3
  • If you live in Ithaca or within driving distance, schedule to pick up an iPad Mini and mobile journalism kit this week.
  • Based on your classmates’ audit (and your own) of your online presence, think about how you might want to update/polish your social media accounts and website.
  • Create a short bio for your social media profiles and a longer version for your website and LinkedIn page. Bring these to class Wednesday so you can share them via a thread I’ll create in our Facebook group. Chapter 3 outlines tips for creating these profiles.
  • Choose a beat/niche you would like to cover this semester. This should be an area that you plan on pursuing in your journalism career. The goal is to carry your expertise and brand you build in this class with you when entering the workforce.
  • Read Professor Frisch’s blog LINK
  • Though this is not required, I highly recommend subscribing to e-newsletters from the following (these are also listed on the Resources page and in the book): 

Poynter
@Poynter and Poynter Newsletter

Pew Research Center
@pewjournalism and Pew Research Newsletter

Nieman Lab
@NiemanLab and Nieman Newsletter

First Draft News
@firstdraftnewsfirstdraftnews.com, and First Draft Newsletter

NPR Training
@nprtrainingtraining.npr.org, and NPR Training Newsletter

BBC Academy
@BBCAcademy and www.bbc.co.uk/academy

In addition, on Professor Adornato’s Twitter account, he has created a Mobile/Social Journalism list of  people who share useful content related to the use of mobile devices and social media in journalism. You’re welcome to subscribe to any of his lists.

Complete these items by Sunday, Feb. 7

(From this point forward, I will publish to-do lists every Sunday and most items must be completed by the following Saturday night.)

  • Watch class lecture for week of Feb. 8 – on class Zoom under “Recordings”
  • Establish professionally oriented accounts on Twitter, Facebook (use the Page function to create a professional one instead of using your personal page), LinkedIn, and YouTube. 
  • If you have an iPad Mini from PPECS, set it up with your own Apple ID. In addition to apps for the previously mentioned sites, download apps for iMovie, Adobe Premiere Rush, Adobe Spark Post, and Adobe Spark Video.
  • Continue with the set-up of your website. For branding purposes, try to keep your website domain and social media handles as close to your name as possible.
  • Finalize your short bio for social media profiles and a longer one for your website and LinkedIn page. Consider making your profile photo, short bio for social media, and longer bio consistent across all platforms.
  • For your Ithaca Week account: add a profile photo, short blurb about you, and links to your professional Twitter and Facebook accounts.
  • Review the blogging tip sheet and rubric. You can find a similar guide on pages 64-65 of the book.

Mobile and Social Media To-Do List #1

Welcome to Mobile and Social Media Journalism! Complete the following items by Monday,  Feb. 1:

1) As a news consumer, how do you use mobile devices and social media? Does that mirror the audience habits/data outlined in Chapter 1?
2) Chapter 1 highlighted how mobile devices and social media are impacting journalists’ work in three ways: newsgathering, distribution of news, and audience engagement. Tell us how you have used new media in any of these three ways for your own reporting and/or share examples you’ve come across from journalists/news outlets use related to these three categories.

Complete these items by Wednesday, Feb. 3:

  • Based on your classmate’s audit (and your own) of your online presence, think about how you might want to update/polish your social media accounts and website.
  • Create a short bio for your social media profiles and a longer version for your website and LinkedIn page. Bring these to class Wednesday. Chapter 3 outlines tips for creating these profiles.
  • Choose a beat/niche you would like to cover this semester. This should be an area that you plan on pursuing in your journalism career. The goal is to carry your expertise and brand you build in this class with you when entering the workforce.
  • I recommend subscribing to e-newsletters from the following (these are also listed on the Resources page and in the book):

Poynter
@Poynter and Poynter Newsletter

Pew Research Center
@pewjournalism and Pew Research Newsletter

Nieman Lab
@NiemanLab and Nieman Newsletter

First Draft News
@firstdraftnewsfirstdraftnews.com, and First Draft Newsletter

NPR Training
@nprtrainingtraining.npr.org, and NPR Training Newsletter

BBC Academy
@BBCAcademy and www.bbc.co.uk/academy

In addition, on my Twitter account, I’ve created a Mobile/Social Journalism list of  people who share useful content related to the use of mobile devices and social media in journalism. You’re welcome to subscribe to any of my lists.

To-Do List #13

We’re in the homestretch. Reminder: story idea pitches tomorrow. 

Due  Midnight Saturday, Dec. 5

  • One blog post related to your beat.
  • The second post must focus on the topic of misinformation and disinformation. Address these questions:
    — How would you define fake news? Do you agree or disagree with the definitions included in the chapter?
    — What responsibility should tech companies assume in fighting the spread of disinformation and misinformation?
    — To what extent are they to blame for the proliferation of it?
    — How do we combat the issue? What role should journalists play in fighting fake news?
  • Share both blog entries to Twitter, professional Facebook page, and LinkedIn.

For Class Monday, Dec. 7

  • Read chapter 8: Mobile and Social Media In Your Career

Continue reading To-Do List #13

To-Do List #11

Through End of Semester

  • Analytics: Visit your analytics, using the analytics worksheet as a guide. (Note: If you use Wix for your website, you have to install the app called Visitor Analytics.) You should jot down a few notes about your analytics once a week from now until the end of the semester.
  • Your analytics will be part of your end-of-the semester reflection due the final week of classes.

Due 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. 

Multimedia Story #4

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week.

  • 550-600 word story with mobile-friendly layout (subheadings, bullet points, key points, pull-quotes, etc.).
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) embedded in your story. Upload to YouTube first and then embed in your story.

Continue reading To-Do List #11

To-Do List #10

For Class Monday, Nov. 9

Through End of Semester

  • Analytics: Visit your analytics, using the analytics worksheet as a guide. (Note: If you use Wix for your website, you have to install the app called Visitor Analytics.) You should jot down a few notes about your analytics once a week from now until the end of the semester.
  • Your analytics will be part of your end-of-the semester reflection due the final week of classes.

Continue reading To-Do List #10

To-Do List #9

Due 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. 

Multimedia Story #3

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week.

  • 550-600 word story with mobile-friendly layout (subheadings, bullet points, key points, pull-quotes, etc.).
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) embedded in your story. Upload to YouTube first and then embed in your story.

Continue reading To-Do List #9

To-Do List #8

Reminder: We’ll have a pitch session during class tomorrow. Come with three election-related story  ideas. If you have not yet signed up for an Election Day shift, please do so ASAP. Link to Google document can be found in our FB group. 

Through End of Semester

  • Analytics: Visit your analytics, using the analytics worksheet as a guide. (Note: If you use Wix for your website, you have to install the app called Visitor Analytics.) You should jot down a few notes about your analytics once a week from now until the end of the semester.
  • Your analytics will be part of your end-of-the semester reflection due the final week of classes.

Due 9 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. 

Multimedia Story #3

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week. Continue reading To-Do List #8

To-Do List #7

Due 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. 

Multimedia Story #2

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week.

  • 550-600 word story with mobile-friendly layout.
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) produced using the iMovie mobile app. Upload the finished video to your YouTube channel and then embedded in your story.
Social Media 

These items must be spread out during the reporting process and completed by 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21. Create a Wakelet with the items mentioned below. This is how I will evaluate and grade your social media engagement for your story. Continue reading To-Do List #7

To-Do List #6

Reminder: We’ll have a pitch session during class tomorrow. Come with three story ideas. At least two out of your four stories this semester must be beat related. 

Due Midnight Saturday, Oct. 17

  • Blogging your beat: Two posts related to your beat. Share both blog entries via Twitter, your professional FB page, and LinkedIn. Think of how you can optimize these posts.
  • Tweeting your beat: Tweet about your beat—let’s say 8-10 times. This can include your blog posts and retweets. I recommend providing context when you retweet something. You should be retweeting, replying , and using hashtags on a regular basis—important for engagement. You do not have to use #ICParkSM for these items. Don’t forget to check your beat-related Twitter list! Also, I recommend building your “following” by routinely following others who will provide you with valuable content and by sharing as well as liking their content. (Tips from NPR: Get a Twitter habit: 5 things to do every day until it sticks)

Continue reading To-Do List #6

To-Do List #5

Due by 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7

Upload the story submission document to the Forum section of our Sakai page. View grading criteria.

Multimedia Story #1

All of these items will be published together on your website by 9 p.m. Wednesday. In my feedback to you, I will let you know if you should publish on Ithaca Week as well. Whenever you post to Ithaca Week, follow the instructions for posting to Ithaca Week. We’ll review these details in class.

  • 550-600 word story with mobile-friendly layout.
  • 2-3 images ideally taken with your mobile device. Remember to caption all photos.
  • Video (1-1:30) produced using the iMovie mobile app. Upload the finished video to your YouTube channel and then embedded in your story.

Continue reading To-Do List #5